Colour in portraits

160915b

160915b (2016) oil on canvas

Still thinking about the colour application from the last post, and also thinking generally about the way unusual colour can work in a portrait. I painted this green man with a red background, nothing planned, just doodling with paint.

It’s the kind of experimentation that makes me think I really ought to be more systematic about investigating my CVD, but instead I find myself using colour in a free-wheeling way that appeals to me, and I simply accept that I’m not seeing it the same way as people with different colour vision.

Here are other unusually coloured portraits that I had in mind. I think most of these are exaggerating or evoking a light effect, but in my painting I was just experimenting with colour arbitrarily.

madamematisse

Henri Matisse The Green Line (Portrait of Madame Matisse) (1905) oil on canvas 40.5 x 32.5cm

Henri Matisse 1905 by Andr? Derain 1880-1954

Andre Derain Henri Matisse (1905) oil on canvas 46 x 34.9cm

vladimirtretchikoff

Vladimir Tretchikoff The Chinese Girl (1953-54) oil on canvas

nicoleeisenmancall1-800-eat-shit

Nicole Eisenman Corn Fed Guy (2005) oil and vinyl sticker on canvas 52 x 40cm

The long face I painted is from imagination, but it came out in a way that reminds me of Stanley Spencer’s 1959 self-portrait (below), and the paint handling reminds me very slightly of late Lucien Freud.

Self-Portrait 1959 by Sir Stanley Spencer 1891-1959

Stanley Spencer Self-Portrait (1959) oil on canvas 50.8 x 40.6cm

lucienfreudrobert-fellowes-jpglarge

Lucien Freud Robert Fellowes (1999) oil on canvas

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2 thoughts on “Colour in portraits

  1. this line of thought is intriguing Liam. I’m fucked if I know what you actually see, but it does’nt appear across the range of pieces you show us that there is any restriction in your palette.

    The green man works. I can’t comment about your memory of the subject, but certainly the textural outcome does remind on of L. Freud. Now that IS nice. And not from a bragging for you perspective, but because it is vey gestural and somehow adds so much to the painting as a pleasurable experience to regard but more, it adds strength to the character we see in the portrait.

    Like

  2. this line of thought is intriguing Liam. I’m fucked if I know what you actually see, but it does’nt appear across the range of pieces you show us that there is any restriction in your palette.

    The green man works. I can’t comment about your memory of the subject, but certainly the textural outcome does remind on of L. Freud. Now that IS nice. And not from a bragging for you perspective, but because it is vey gestural and somehow adds so much to the painting as a pleasurable experience to regard but more, it adds strength to the character we see in the portrait.

    Like

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