Wet on dry, monochromatic

170622aMountainRoadSmall

170622a Mountain Road (2017) oil on canvas 18 x 23cm

Experimenting with wet on dry. Usually I don’t do this because I don’t have the patience to wait for a painting to dry before continuing to work on it. Some of these are worked from photographs, others from imagination.

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170622b House in Snow (2017) oil on canvas 19 x 21cm

I’m using only one colour of paint for each painting, lightening it with white and darkening it with black. This is an experiment to avoid hue issues in regard to my CVD.

170622cAldersonsCheckerBoardSmall

170622d Aldeson’s Checker Board (2017) oil on canvas 27 x 21cm

170622fBlueTeapotSmall

170622f Blue Teapot (2017) oil on canvas 15 x 25cm

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170622g Blue Coat (2017) oil on canvas 20 x 15cm

Ouija Board Woman

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170615 Ouija Board Woman (2017) oil on canvas 90 x 60cm

Another one made from a small sketch. I’m thinking maybe in future I should choose more carefully when I’m deciding which sketch to paint. The translation from black and white to colour involves depth effects that I’m still only beginning to understand. Still, I learnt a lot from painting this.

170605Sketch

170605 Ouija Board Woman Sketch (2017) pencil on paper 14.5 x 9.2cm

I used a limited palette of Titanium White, Cadmium Yellow, Cerulean Blue, and a muted brick-red (pre-mixed from Cadmium Red, Cadmium Orange and Burnt Umber). I think limiting the palette helped to unify my colours a little, although my use of them still went haywire. I didn’t use black, and the darkest tone possible from this palette wasn’t very dark. I also didn’t mix the light colours as light as I could have, so the overall contrast isn’t as high as I usually like it.

I tried to use colour in a way that’s sympathetic to the form and perspective. I kept in mind the idea that warm colours come forward, and cool colours retreat, and that saturated colours come forward and muted colours retreat. I didn’t apply these principles expertly, so the picture has strange inconsistent depth effects that don’t serve the image coherently, but I definitely got more familiar with this aspect of colour in the process of making this painting. The push-pull effects of colour are new to me, I didn’t intuitively have a sense of how that was working until I read some colour theory, but now I’m seeing how it works and I’m excited about finding ways to make the colours work with the image instead of working against it.

Dirty brushes

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170611e Pthalo Blue (2017) oil on canvas 100 x 75cm

This is a reaction against the cartoonish saturated colours of the previous painting. Dirty colours, mostly from not washing the brushes when changing colour, keeping the tone steady enough to describe the form, but letting the hue crash about haphazardly. Even with the glasses on, my perception of hue is nowhere near as sensitive as normal vision, so it’s easy for me to accept jarring shifts in hue (many of which I probably can’t see at all) and allow tone to dominate the way I read the image.

This was painted impatiently, and some of it quite thickly. I prefer this surface to the previous painting. I know some post modernist painters have questioned the idea of gestural brushwork as “expressive”, making it out to be just another technique that acts as a sign. I don’t agree with that. I think it can function in that way, but when I paint like this it’s not to signal expression, it’s because I’m in an agitated state, and the result is a record or trace of that agitation.

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170611e Pthalo Blue [detail] (2017) oil on canvas

Broken Mirror Smoker

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170611a Broken Mirror Smoker (2017) oil on canvas 100 x 85cm

Not nuts about this one. Colour, brushwork, composition, drawing – it all makes me think of amateurish children’s book illustration. Back to the drawing board.

This was based on a small sketch. I think I just didn’t have any good ideas about how to translate it into colour, or into paint. On the other hand, I think sometimes I learn most from trying to make paintings that I don’t yet know how to. This one is making me want to look again at colour theory.

170521BrokenMirrorSmokerSketch

170521 Broken Mirror Smoker Sketch (2017) pencil on paper 12.5 x 11cm

Permanent Rose

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170601 Permanent Rose (2017) oil on canvas 100 x 85cm

Permanent Rose is the name of the red paint used to make the pinks on her dress, lips, and inside the cup. Lately I’ve been basing paintings on small drawings, scaling up the original sketch using a projector. Here’s the drawing for this painting.

170530BlondeWithTrophySketch

170530 Blond with Trophy (2017) ballpoint pen on paper 20 x 16.3cm